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  • How to Block Sun from Windows

    Windows provide warmth, light, and security, and play an important part in our living environments. They are the predominant source of natural light, resulting in a warm and inviting atmosphere for families and friends. However, there are occasions when too much sunlight is unpleasant, causing discomfort in our houses during specific seasons of the year.

    Let's be honest: all of our money spent on air conditioning could be wasted if we don't prevent heat from infiltrating through our windows.

    Fortunately, there are several techniques to successfully stop the sun's heat from entering our homes through the windows. While some ways may be more effective than others, diligent comparison allows us to choose the best answer for our specific circumstances.

     

    1. Heat-blocking window treatments.

    Installing window blinds is a quick solution to solar overheating. It will not cure the problem, but it will reduce heat gain. You can install them yourself, making this a simple do-it-yourself project. To gain the most benefit, use the correct type of window shades to block the heat and position them as near to the glass as feasible.

    Cellular or honeycomb blinds are the most effective for insulation. The honeycomb form traps air, decreasing solar heat gain. You might also think about adding side tracks to your shades so they can sit closer to the window and block off additional heat.

    Keep in mind the color you select as well. A lighter color, such as white or beige, will aid to reflect sunlight. White honeycomb blinds may or may not complement your home's interior color design. You may always hang drapes to fix any aesthetic difficulties, but by the time you buy quality window sun shades, sidetracks, and drapes, this will no longer be a cheap option to block the heat.

     

    2. Shading of External Windows

    Another strategy is to generate shade outside your window. Depending on the strategy you select, you may be able to generate enough sun shade on your own, but depending on your level of competence with DIY projects, you may want to hire a professional. Plants and trees near your windows will help to shade the light and keep the area just outside your home cooler. Plants chill the air around them when they lose water vapor.

    Awnings or eaves can also be installed from the outside over the window. This limits the quantity of sunlight coming in through the window. It may be necessary to get the advice of a professional to ensure that the shade is applied at the proper angle for the greatest results.

    Visit us: Best review Ceiling fans for your home 2024

     

    3. Darkening roller or panel blinds.

    Installing blockout curtains over your windows is another solution for keeping out solar heat. Blockout blinds are opaque, which means they block out all light. They, like heat blocking window shades, provide a modest level of heat blocking power - even more so if they are closer to the glass, a reflecting color, and constructed of high-quality material.

    One significant disadvantage of blackout blinds is that they are meant to block light rather than heat. As a result, they are great for keeping a room dark, such as bedrooms with windows that face the rising light. However, in order to get the heat-saving benefits, you must sacrifice natural light.

     

    4. Window Insulation with Bubble Wrap.

    Suppose you want a true low-cost solution and aren't concerned about how your window will look. In that case, bubble wrap window insulation is a viable alternative if you only want to temporarily block out the summer sun. Does using bubble wrap on windows actually work? So, sort of. By generating a layer of still, trapped air, bubble wrap improves the insulating capabilities of your windows.

    To for it to work, make sure the bubble wrap is completely wrappedd and sealed around the glass. This low-cost double glazing option can also assist in insulating your windows from chilly air in the winter but don't expect a significant change. If you need a solution right now and don't want to spend money, bubble wrap can serve as a low-cost summer or winter insulating package.

     

    5. Using Multiple Methods 

    All of these do-it-yourself strategies for preventing sunlight heat from windows will be beneficial in their own manner. However, none of them are capable of completing the entire task. Blockout blinds and shades, for example, cannot prevent sunlight from entering the window from the outside. This implies that, even if you're preventing heat from traveling through and around the window dressing, once the glass heats up from the outside, the heat energy is still present and will inevitably leak into your home.

    Outdoor shade options are a fantastic partial answer, and by adding plants to your home, you can also improve its attractiveness. However, as the sun moves (technically, as the earth moves), the angle of the sunlight changes, resulting in undesired heat gain at certain periods of the day.

     

    6.Heat-reflective window film.

    Consider utilizing a special heat-reducing plastic coating. You can install a special insulating plastic film over your windows. It creates a small air hole when attached to the interior of the glass, comparable to plastic bubble wrap. Again, you won't notice much of a difference with this strategy, but if you acquire enough film to cover all of your windows, you can keep some heat out while still enjoying natural light.

    Plastic film and bubble wrap provide a low-cost double glazing solution, but they are ineffective and unsightly. You can't see out your window when it's covered in bubble wrap. That means you'll have to say goodbye to your vistas of nature.

    You'll have the greatest influence if you combine two, three, or more of these strategies. Installing blinds or shades, putting plastic, and working on producing outside shade will all help if you truly want to do it yourself. However, your windows will likely appear jumbled, you will still have faulty heat blockage, and all of the money you were attempting to save has been wasted on layers of cheap DIY solutions.

    You can still profit from double glazed windows without making a large investment.

     

    Last Thought.

    While there are many costly alternatives available, such as installing new energy-efficient windows or purchasing a high-end air conditioning unit, there are also some inexpensive and simple options.

    Some solutions are unquestionably more appealing than others, and if appearances are unimportant, you can block heat nearly for nothing.

    In this post, we'll look at some of the most effective and cost-effective ways to keep your home cool and comfortable all summer.

    You're likely to discover a solution that meets your budget, whether you're seeking easy DIY solutions or low-cost products.

    Source: Ceiling Fans Living

    Contact Information: 

    Our website: Ceiling Fans Living: https://ceilingfansliving.com/ 

    Gmail:  ceilingfansliving@gmail.com

    ➽➽➽ Address: 2518 7th St, Livermore, CA 94550, United State

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